The Trend Report: Emerging 2016 Insights

The Urban Land Institue recently released their annual report on the emerging trends in Real Estate for the year! Here are just a few highlights from their findings on the trends we can expect to see emerge nationally over the course of 2016!

Second Tier Cities Take Center Stage

Second tier cites such as Austin are booming, and according to the report, these cities are only getting started. In addition to their reputations for hipness, cities such as Nashville, San Antonio, Portland, Austin and Raleigh-Durham are also attracting attention for their lower costs of living, and their increasing ease of staying connected far from main hubs, more upside from affordable and available investment opportunities, and increasing sophistication from realtors and investors.

Will Millennial Parents Move to the ‘Burbs?

A generation traditionally known for their obsession with urban living, a growing number of Millenials are becoming parents and looking to find homes and good schools for their children. While this generation has put off having kids longer than previous generations, recent studies suggest that a larger number will soon become parents, and could quickly fuel a suburban boom. However, these won’t be the suburbs of yesteryear. Studies show that young millennial parents will be drawn to more mixed-use, walkable developments, offering a mix of urban and suburban benefits with quick easy access to the city’s core.

Investment in the Changing Office Landscape

The continued recovery of the US economy has led not only to job growth, but also a strengthening of the commercial sector. Open office plans still dominate the market and the average SF per worker, which was 253 in 2000, is predicted to shrink to 138 by the year 2020. Showing no signs of slowing down, investors can expect to see continued development and redevelopment of existing spaces, as well as a continued rise in coworking.

Pulling Up Parking Lots?

As many young Americans opt out of car ownership, and tech trends such as ride-sharing and autonomous cars begin to change transportation patterns, many urban planners, government officials, and real estate owners are questioning if parking lots are the best use of downtown real estate. Trends suggest that “existing parking represents a suboptimal use of land,” and as cities change zoning regulations to reflect these shifts, developers are asking how they can take advantage. Are surface lots and parking structures potential development opportunities?

Increasing Investment in Infrastructure

America’s crumbling infrastructure has been in the news for years, yet the need for new mass transit, better roads and highways, and improved aviation and rail facilities hasn’t been met: the American Society for Civil Engineers estimates that $3.6 trillion would be needed by 2020 to meet the backlog of much-needed repairs. This suggests there’s a great upside in new models for infrastructure funding, including public-private partnerships and real estate investment trusts (REITs).

Urban Agriculture Is On The Rise

While conceding that we’re not likely to see silos dot the skyline anytime soon, the ULI report suggests that an increasing number of viable urban farms and rooftop gardens, including Brooklyn Grange in New York, large urban farm operations in Detroit, and a forthcoming vertical farm in Newark, New Jersey.

CLICK HERE to read the full report and discover the rest of the exciting emerging trends for this year!

SplitLine
Make sure you’re staying on top of the latest trends, newest developments and hottest new stores in Huntsville by subscribing to our weekly blog updates!

404220_10150473102152791_1516819070_nKadie_Sig
KADIE PANGBURN
MARKETING COORDINATOR
CRUNKLETON & ASSOCIATES
KADIE@CRUNKLETONASSOCIATES.COM
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s