New Stovehouse Renderings Released, Revival Underway!

The historic Martin Stove Building on Governors Drive is the site of Huntsville’s next destination for dining, shopping, and entertainment. Stovehouse was first announced last September along with early sketches of the coming development. But now, the latest renderings reveal the full breadth of the project and showcase the much-anticipated food garden, rooftop wine bar, entertainment stage, and abundant courtyards.

(Click here to read the full press release.)

The future view of Stovehouse when looking on from 9th Street.

Stovehouse owner/co-developer Danny Yancey purchased the building in 2016 along with his wife Patti and they immediately recognized the historic property’s potential. The goal quickly became to create a new kind of adaptive-reuse project that blended history, innovation, and urban energy—reflecting the character of Huntsville itself.

“From the first time I walked through the huge building, I saw huge potential,” said Danny. “We’re working with Centric Architecture to preserve the past while building a destination that serves Huntsville today. Where Rome Stove and Martin Stove produced durable goods, we’ll be manufacturing leisure.”

When studying the renderings, it’s easy to see the many leisure activities available. A balance of office life, fitness, food, and entertainment make Stovehouse a one-stop shop, creating a seamless transition from a productive workday to a carefree evening.

The future view of Stovehouse when looking on from 9th Street.

Stovehouse will offer tenants access to high-quality amenities and a vibrant community hub suited for everything from networking events to family-friendly activities. And its ultra-convenient location near I-565, Memorial Parkway, and Downtown puts it in the center of major Huntsville attractions.

“We already have firm commitments from tenants who will make Stovehouse a unique, high-traffic destination,” stated Stovehouse co-developer and leasing agent Wesley Crunkleton of Crunkleton Commercial Real Estate. “Curating the proper tenant mix at Stovehouse is vital, and we are focused on finding the ideal entertainment, retail, restaurant, and office combination to ensure the development thrives.”

If you are interested in becoming a part of Stovehouse, contact Crunkleton Commercial Real Estate at info@crunkletonassociates.com or call 256-536-8809. Or fill out a leasing inquiry on the Stovehouse website here.

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haley_squareHALEY CLEMONS
MARKETING COORDINATOR
CRUNKLETON COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE GROUP
HALEY@CRUNKLETONASSOCIATES.COM

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Must-Know Commercial Real Estate Terms: Take Two!

In the past, we have shared with you some of the most important and frequently used terminology to be aware of when leasing your first commercial space. Today, we want to expand that knowledge and give you a new list of must-know terms that will help you plan, negotiate, and execute your commercial real estate deal with success.

Here are some of the most common terms and classifications used in commercial real estate leasing:

1. (FF&E) Furniture, Fixtures, and Equipment

FF&E is the Furniture, Fixtures, and Equipment necessary for a tenant to operate their business inside a landlord’s premises. For office properties, this generally consists of desks, computers, copiers, etc. In restaurant spaces, it typically includes tables and chairs, coolers, vent hoods, kitchen equipment, and the like.

Tenants are usually allowed to remove their furniture and equipment upon vacating the space as long as they vacate in good standing with the landlord—which means having met all of their lease obligations. However, fixtures that are permanently attached to the premises are a different matter, as they are now considered part of the property.

For example, the vent hood and cooler are generally considered to be permanently attached fixtures in a restaurant space because removing them can cause damage to the property; therefore, these need to be left inside the premises when the tenant vacates.

A broker can help you determine which items will fall into the FF&E category.

 2. Building Classification

Searching for the perfect space can be a daunting task. But letting your broker know what you are looking for ahead of time will help speed up the process. Building class is a great way to get the conversation going. But how do you determine which one is right for you?

  • Class A – If you’re looking for the highest-quality building with well-designed, above-average materials and many amenities, then Class A is for you. Many prestigious tenants seek out this class of property because they are typically in the best location and well maintained.
  • Class B – Though they aren’t outfitted with as many amenities as Class A spaces, Class B property offers very useful space and a functional layout. Class B buildings are, more often than not, older than Class A, but they are still very well maintained.
  • Class C – Class C is usually the oldest space in the classification system and has fewer amenities available to tenants than Class A or B. Lessees can expect average to below-average maintenance and management, and average mechanical, electrical and ventilation systems. Cost for these spaces are usually on the lower end.

Still have questions about which building class is for you? Contact our brokers at info@crunkletonassociates.com.

3. Maximum and Minimum Contiguous

Maximum Contiguous space is the largest divisible area allowed in a property. For example, multiple spaces or suites on the same floor or connecting floors in the same building may be combined to meet the tenant’s needs. The amount of space that can be combined is the maximum contiguous square footage.

Minimum Contiguous is, as it sounds, the smallest divisible area allowed in a property.

 4. First-generation vs. Second-generation Space

This is a fairly easy one to define. Second-generation space, also known as “relet” space, is existing space that was previously occupied by a tenant.

First-generation space means that the space has never been occupied.

Knowing the generation status of your space can help you determine whether or not you need to consider build-out and create a more accurate timeline for when you can occupy the space.

Be sure to ask your broker if a first or second-generation space will be the best fit for your future plans.

5. Work Letter

An important part of commercial real estate leases, a work letter outlines the responsibilities of the landlord and tenant when it comes to improvements that are necessary to prepare the leased space for occupancy.

The letter may include items like a list of space improvements, timelines for the projects, and contractor-related information. The work letter is often part of the final lease document.

Have questions about searching for or leasing a space? We are here to help you reach your goals. Contact us at info@crunkletonassociates.com!

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haley_squareHALEY CLEMONS
MARKETING COORDINATOR
CRUNKLETON COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE GROUP
HALEY@CRUNKLETONASSOCIATES.COM

Historic Huntsville: The Hotel Twickenham

On an April afternoon in 1914, the City of Huntsville was at a standstill. The Daily Times headline read, “Fitting Exercises In Celebration ‘Breaking Dirt’ For New Hotel.” The article following relayed the names of several businesses that would close from 1:30-3 pm that day, and children praised the ceremony for helping end the school day at noon.

Crowds advanced to the city center and patiently waited for the festivities to begin. It was the official groundbreaking of the Hotel Twickenham and Huntsville had never seen such an elaborate spectacle.

At 2 pm, the nearby factories blew their whistles to welcome the hotel into existence. Brass bands boomed, crowds cheered, and a golden shovel—held by a Miss Elizabeth Cooper—officially broke ground.

The Hotel Twickenham claimed its title as the “Pride of Huntsville” during its heyday. An establishment steeped in elegance, Twickenham was the getaway of choice for dignitaries and traveling businessmen, and known as the venue where locals wined, dined, and enjoyed elaborate parties from 1915-1971.

Pictured: Groundbreaking ceremony of the Hotel Twickenham in 1914. Photo credit: Huntsville History Collection, The Historic Huntsville Quarterly, Huntsville Public Library Heritage Room

Its life on the corner of Clinton Avenue and Washington Street is one of glory, with stories that often involve the hotel’s famed manager Quincy B. Love. Adored by the community and hailed as one of the most active and progressive members of the town, his passing was greatly mourned.

Today, a municipal parking garage sits where the Hotel Twickenham once stood. But it is fondly remembered as “The Best American plan hotel in Alabama.”

Photo courtesy Huntsville Library Archives. Twickenham hotel (pictured left).

The Hotel Twickenham – “Pride Of Huntsville”

In many ways, the features of the Twickenham Hotel were firsts for Huntsville. Most notably, the hotel was advertised as being fireproof. This was important to many people at the time because fires at the nearby Huntsville Hotel devastated the community in both 1910 and 1911. Clearly, it was still at the forefront of Huntsvillians’ minds.

Creation of the hotel was headed by William F. Struve and Quincy B. Love who partnered to build it at the site of the old Huntsville City Hall.

“Bess Hay, William Struve’s niece, came up with the name ‘Twickenham’ for the hotel,” shared Donna Castellano, Executive Director of the Historic Huntsville Foundation. “The Clinton Avenue hotel had five stories, 80 rooms, and one elevator. And it opened with great fanfare in 1915 with a seated dinner for 200.”

“Never has there been a larger or more representative gathering in this city, for the response to invitations for the banquet was generous.” – The Times, March 11, 1915

Invitations to a grand opening banquet were sent out to the city and welcomed with much excitement. Hallways of the ornate hotel were decorated with bundles of flowers, and guests were treated to an exotic menu of green sea turtle, roast young turkey, and asparagus on toast.

Mr. Love spoke to guests and assured them that the hotel would run on a very high plane business plan. Music played softly in the background as the Florence Orchestra serenaded the room, and toasts were made to a bright future.

The Hotel’s Heyday

It was said that many traveling businessmen would arrange their itineraries around a stay at the Twickenham. Huntsville itself was a popular spot for hotel developments because it was situated between major trade routes. And the city’s scenic beauty even further convinced travelers to have their stopovers there.

For many years, the Twickenham was famous for its incredible service—no doubt thanks to Mr. Love—and delectable cuisine. Guests described the rooms as large, airy, light, and cheerful. They also appreciated the fair pricing when dining in at the establishment.

Twickenham, like many of the other early Huntsville hotels, offered auxiliary businesses like coffee shops, gift shops, pool halls, and a barbershop as well.

Parade down Clinton Avenue. Hotel Twickenham is pictured on the left. Photo credit: Huntsville History Collection, The Historic Huntsville Quarterly, Mary Medaris Burgess Lee

Under the attentive management of Love, the Hotel Twickenham won recognition as the “Best American plan hotel” in Alabama. And the sensation of the hotel showed no signs of stopping.

But in 1925, tragedy struck.

The Passing Of Mr. Love

“Death of Love Caused Sorrow,” was the headline of an article in the Times on June 8, 1925. Quincy B. Love passed away at 3 o’clock in the morning, and the city was devastated by the news.

Regarded as one of the most popular men in Huntsville, Love’s passing was observed as a “distinct community loss.”

According to the Times, “Mr. Love was perhaps the most popular hotel man in Alabama, especially with the traveling men. Nearly all of these knew him intimately, and the others who patronized him knew him but to love him.

Photo courtesy Huntsville Library archives.

“He came to Huntsville at a time when our city was practically without hotel facilities and built the magnificent Twickenham, standing as it does ‘The Pride of Huntsville.’”

Love was also remembered for his ability to bring together community leaders and create positive change. Described as a man who was “never satisfied with giving up,” he brought transformation to Huntsville that directed the city to where it is today.

The article closed with a final remark on Love’s success. “Whoever succeeds him there will find a standard of service that should never be lowered…He is gone now and we shall miss him. Peace be to his ashes and may the tender love and benediction of our Heavenly Father attend his loved ones and bless his memory.”

It was later reported that the auditorium at his funeral was full—a testament to the kind of man he was.

Fire insurance map that shows the Hotel Twickenham on Clinton Avenue. Courtesy Huntsville Library Archives.

A 1984 edition of The Historic Huntsville Quarterly of Local Architecture and Preservation stated “Mr. Love’s untimely death in 1925 dealt a blow to the Twickenham from which it never recovered. His wife managed it for a while, and then his son, Quincy, Jr., but never with his success.”

When the Russel Erskine was built in 1929, it created thriving competition for the existing Huntsville hotels. Although business at the Twickenham slowed down, it remained a popular venue for small parties and dances. Management of Twickenham was passed to different hands during its lifetime, but many still saw the hotel as a monument to Quincy B. Love.

Becoming The Clinton Avenue Garage

Although the hotel closed to guests in 1971, its popularity was briefly revived in 1974 when it served as a downtown senior center. The Fellowship Center, as it was called, transformed the old building into a place for seniors to enjoy dancing, laughing, and social gatherings.

Photo courtesy Huntsville Library archives.

Events at the Fellowship Center were many, and several took place in the Twickenham Hotel ballroom—including a Customs and Cultures luncheon in which people from other countries would bring food to share.

But as time went on, the space once again needed a new purpose. In 1975, the city council voted to build the Clinton Avenue parking garage on the site.

Photo courtesy Huntsville Library Archives.

On June 2, 1975, the hotel was demolished, along with other Clinton Avenue buildings to make way for the new city parking garage.

The Revitalization of Downtown Huntsville

Today, the Clinton Avenue parking garage has found new life with the addition of several retail shops to its ground floor. Now known as The Garage at Clinton Row, the development brought back several of the business services that were once offered near the Hotel Twickenham—a coffee shop, men’s wear, boutiques, and others.

The development for the Garage was completed in 2016 and celebrated with a grand opening party. Today, Clinton Avenue is a major retail destination for both local and regional shopping—and a place where locals spend time mingling.

As the City of Huntsville continues to grow, it’s incredible to look back at where we once were.

In the same spot, more than 100 years apart, Clinton Avenue was home to a grand opening celebration. Although the scenery has transformed, the love for our city and the hope for a better future hasn’t changed at all.

Do you have more information on the Hotel Twickenham? We always want to make sure we have the most accurate info. All information in this article is courtesy of the Huntsville Public Library archives. 

Contact Haley Clemons at haley@crunkletonassociates.com to add to this story. 

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haley_squareHALEY CLEMONS
MARKETING COORDINATOR
CRUNKLETON COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE GROUP
HALEY@CRUNKLETONASSOCIATES.COM

Development Updates: “Times Plaza” & “Williamsburg Plaza”

There’s a lot going on in Huntsville in terms of development. In fact, an article recently released by al.com shares current U.S. Census figures that show Huntsville metro is still growing at a fast pace. We are always excited to be involved with this growth and help talented businesses become a part of the Madison County community.

As promised, Crunkleton will bring you updates on the progress of projects that we have already announced, and we have two for you today.

Read on below to see the latest from “Times Plaza” and “Williamsburg Plaza”!

Times Plaza

When driving past the old Huntsville Times site off the Parkway, you may have noticed the new sign that showcases renderings of the completed “Times Plaza” development.

We are thrilled to share the latest renderings of the project with you so you can see what’s coming. Check it out!

Times Plaza is the official name of the development that will be situated at 2317 South Memorial Parkway. It will be a mixed-use retail/office development that will house multiple exciting tenants including restaurants, boutiques, and more.

(We have a tenant announcement coming very soon, so check back here!)

Click here to see details on the property.

Williamsburg Plaza

Last November, we announced the addition of a new 8,200 square foot development coming to the corner of Highway 72 and Nance Road: Williamsburg Plaza. The site includes two confirmed tenants—Bank Independent and Aspen Dental.

As an addition to one of the city’s busiest retail corridors, it’s easy to see the development’s construction progress when driving by. Walls are up, and passersby can now make out the roof of the Colonial Williamsburg-style Bank Independent location.

According to the development team, “Construction continues at Williamsburg Plaza on the corner of Highway 72 and Nance Road. For the most part, the weather has cooperated and plans are on schedule. Williamsburg Plaza expects tenants to open up during the 4th Quarter of this year.”

Click here to see details on the property.

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haley_squareHALEY CLEMONS
MARKETING COORDINATOR
CRUNKLETON COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE GROUP
HALEY@CRUNKLETONASSOCIATES.COM