Huntsville Speaks: STOVEHOUSE

It’s time again for another “Huntsville Speaks” where we ask for feedback from the community on what YOU want to see come to the Rocket City!

Your input matters, and that’s why we continue to ask you what it is you’d like to see and enjoy in Huntsville. You speak, we listen—and we go out and try to make it happen!

This time, we are asking everyone to weigh in on our latest big announcement: STOVEHOUSE. Not only will this development be home to the city’s first urban food garden, but it will also include a rooftop wine bar and plenty of space for events—big and small!

We’d love to hear YOUR ideas on what restaurants and eateries you’d like to see in this one-of-a-kind historic space. We are looking for unique, regional concepts. Is there something in Birmingham, Chattanooga, Atlanta, or Nashville that you’d like to see here? Comment below and let us know!

Need a little help brainstorming? Here are some examples of what could be fitting for this space.

“What restaurants and eateries would you love to see at STOVEHOUSE?”

 Food from around the world:

Are there concepts out there that feature cuisine from a specific region that you’re passionate about? Restaurants that serve up favorites from around the world are always a popular choice. Döner kebab, dumplings, falafels, pierogies, gyros, ramen—there’s a lot out there to choose from!

 Food for the dessert lover:

Are you ruled by your sweet tooth? When we see shops that serve cookie dough, specialty ice cream, macaroons, and pies, we can’t help but want them nearby. What kind of dessert shops would you like to see at STOVEHOUSE?

Food for specific diets:

Restaurants like Mason Dixon Bakery & Bistro have seen a lot of success in Huntsville because they offer incredible fare for customers with gluten allergies or other dietary restrictions. There are a growing number of options in the culinary world for vegans, vegetarians, and people who prefer to eat organic or local. Would you like to see more restaurants like this in Huntsville? If so, which ones?

Those are just a few ideas to get your creative juices flowing. What restaurant concepts do you want to see at STOVEHOUSE?

Comment below and let us know! Or send us a direct message on Facebook or Instagram. We are listening.

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HALEY CLEMONS
MARKETING COORDINATOR
CRUNKLETON COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE GROUP
HALEY@CRUNKLETONASSOCIATES.COM

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Huntsville Speaks: Downtown Entertainment

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Last year we started a new feature on our blog called “Huntsville Speaks,” and we’re back again for more community feedback!

We believe our city should be shaped by the people who live in it, that’s why we want to hear what you have to say.  You speak, we listen, and then we go out and try to make it happen!

Right now we are working on several exciting Downtown projects and we want to know:

“What entertainment options would you love to see come to Downtown Huntsville!?”

Any good Downtown worth its salt is always filled with a variety of retail shopping, dining and entertainment options.  Well Downtown Huntsville is growing by leaps and bounds with additions like The Garage At Clinton Row and The Avenue providing much needed retail and dining to the area, but what about entertainment!?

That’s why we’re working right  now to help fill the gap and solidify that final piece of the downtown puzzle, but we need your help finding out what entertainment options you’re looking for in Downtown!  Do you want to go see cult classic movies? Go bowling? Shoot pool, or maybe catch indie music show?

Here’s a few of our top pics for entertainment we’d love to see come to Downtown Huntsville to kick off the conversation, but let us know what YOU want to see in the comment section below:

A View & Brew Movie Theatre

New Parkway Theatre – Oakland California

A Pool Hall & Bowling Alley

Garage Billiards – Seattle Washington

An Indie Live Music Venue

The Basement – Nashville TN

Now it’s your turn! What entertainment options do you want to see come to Downtown Huntsville!?

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Make sure you’re staying on top of the latest trends, newest developments and hottest new stores in Huntsville by subscribing to our weekly blog updates!

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KADIE PANGBURN
MARKETING COORDINATOR
CRUNKLETON Commercial Real EState Group
KADIE@CRUNKLETONASSOCIATES.COM

Huntsville Speaks: Regional Boutiques

HSV_Speaks_Boutiques

Earlier this year we started a new feature on our blog called “Huntsville Speaks,” and we’re back again for more community feedback!

We believe our city should be shaped by the people who live in it, that’s why we want to hear what you have to say.  You speak, we listen, and then we go out and try to make it happen!

Right now we are working on an exciting new project which will feature small local and regional boutiques from all around the southeast and we want to know:

“What local and regional boutiques would YOU love to see come to Huntsville!?”

Do you have that one small local shop that you’ll drive 100 miles to visit because it’s just THAT GOOD!? We want to hear about it!

And just to get the ball rolling we’ll share a couple of our favorites to start, then it’s your turn! Leave us a comment and let us hear which regional boutiques YOU want to see come to Huntsville!

Jondie
Franklin, TN

Hanover Blue & Alice Blue
Chattanooga, TN

Behind The Glass
Auburn, AL

Hey Rooster – General Store
Nashville, TN

Now it’s your turn! What regional boutiques do you want to see come to Huntsville!?

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Make sure you’re staying on top of the latest trends, newest developments and hottest new stores in Huntsville by subscribing to our weekly blog updates!

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KADIE PANGBURN
MARKETING COORDINATOR
CRUNKLETON & ASSOCIATES
KADIE@CRUNKLETONASSOCIATES.COM

Could Adaptive Reuse Be The Key To Unlocking Huntsville’s Full Potential?

For those unfamiliar with the term “adaptive reuse,”  basically it’s a fancy way of saying you’re going to find a new use for an old building, or if we want to get more technical about it, “a process by which structurally sound older buildings are developed for economically viable new uses.”

The concept itself isn’t new, but really came into mainstream architectural parlance during the 1960s and 1970s due to the growing concern for the environment.  This, combined with high material costs, difficulties in securing building permits, and the growing preservation movement which was gaining ground due the national attention the grassroots efforts to save SoHo and Penn Statation were receiving in New York City at the time,  “resulted in adaptive reuse becoming a viable alternative to new construction,” stated  Sophie Cantell in an essay on The Adaptive Reuse of Historic Industrial Buildings.

But why? What are the benefits of adaptive reuse over simply building new?

Of course there is the fact that historic buildings help to “define the character of our communities by providing a tangible link with the past,” Cantell stated.  But there are also social and economic benefits to the community as well says Cantell.   “A successful adaptive reuse project can bring redevelopment, heritage tourism, and new life into a community.”

the-huntsville-timesbob-gathany-50da7f22e5f0db2bProof of this is already starting to trickle through our city as successful local adaptive reuse projects such as Lowe Mill are having an increasing impact on our community and new projects such as Campus No. 805 (the old Stone Middle School site) and Huntsville West (the former West Huntsville Elementary School) are popping up.

Here are just a few more creative projects from around the US that are igniting our imaginations right now for how adaptive reuse could have a big impact on Huntsville!

The Pratt Power Plant
Built in 1900, the plant served as the main source of power for the United Railways and Electric Company and later served as a central steam plant for the Consolidated Gas, Electric Light and Power Company and finally shut down in 1973.  Since then the plant has gone under an adaptive reuse to become a mixed-use, office, retail and entertainment facility.
PrattPowerPlant
The High Line
The High Line (also known as High Line Park) was once a portion of the West Side rail line running to the Lower West Side of Manhattan that had been abandoned since the 1980s.   When plans to demolish the disused line caused a community outcry, the High Line went under a creative adaptive reuse to create a 1.45 mile long linear park.
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Olio 
Built in 1937 as an Oil Station, the building went under an adaptive reuse to become a restaurant, complete with original subway tiles and salvaged brick.
Olio Restaurant Exterior; Saint Louis, Mo., owned by Chef Ben Poremba

Rhode Island Mill
Built in 1901 as a textile mill and closing it’s doors in 2001, this old mill went under an adaptive reuse to convert the 102,000 SF building into 63 dwelling units for low income families, complete with a Head Start daycare and business center.
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770 North Point
A parking garage built just after the turn of the century in San Francisco went under adaptive reuse to become a Patagonia clothing store.
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Could projects like this help revitalize more of the Huntsville area and breathe life into the older industrial sectors of our city?   We’d love to know what you think!  Leave a comment below and let us know what Huntsville buildings you’d love to see go through an adaptive reuse!

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Make sure you’re staying on top of the latest trends, newest developments and hottest new stores in Huntsville by subscribing to our weekly blog updates!

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KADIE PANGBURN
MARKETING COORDINATOR
CRUNKLETON & ASSOCIATES
KADIE@CRUNKLETONASSOCIATES.COM